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Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Courses

Each academic year is divided into three quarters, Fall, Winter and Spring. Each quarter consists of ten weeks of instruction with a week following instruction devoted to final exams. During any one quarter, the Math Department offers 40 or more undergraduate courses in a range of fields.


Graduate Courses

Each academic year is divided into three quarters, Fall, Winter and Spring. Each quarter consists of ten weeks of instruction with a week following instruction devoted to final exams. During any one quarter, the Math Department offers 30 or more graduate courses in a range of fields.

New students arrive with a variety of backgrounds. Some have already taken extensive coursework before arriving at UCSD and should attempt to take some qualifying exams in the Fall when they arrive. Beginning in the Fall, a new student works with an assigned faculty advisor to take several 3-quarter sequences which will prepare the student to take some qualifying exams in the Spring. See http://www.math.ucsd.edu/programs/graduate-program/phd-mathematics/. For example, a student planning to take the algebra and statistics qualifying exams in the Spring will most likely plan to take the sequences Math 200 A-B-C and Math 281A-B-C. The qualifying exam courses tend to be very structured in terms of classroom and homework time. Students should expect to attend all classes and homework problem sessions as well as spend a significant portion of their time preparing for the qualifying exams. The Masters programs are two year programs which conclude with the passing of various exams.

Students in the Ph.D. program who have passed all their qualifying exams often will take graduate courses which cover topics that can lead to research in various fields. Ph.D. students are expected to find a thesis advisor by the end of the 9th quarter. One option is to take a reading course (Math 299) with a faculty member where the student reads research papers related to the faculty member's area of research. This allows students to become more familiar with the faculty and helps the student to find an advisor. 3rd, 4th and 5th year graduate students are often participating in seminars where faculty and students present material associated to research papers or new results in a field. A weekly schedule of seminars is posted at http://www.math.ucsd.edu/announcements/seminars/.