Course Calendar

This calendar is subject to change throughout the quarter; it was last updated on 5/9/2011. The chapter references are to Eccles' book.

Week

Monday

Wednesday

Friday


1 3/28
1, 2
3/30
1, 2
4/1
3

2 4/4 HW 1 due
4
4/6
4, 6
4/8 LF 1 due
6

3 4/11 HW 2 due
7, 8
4/13
7, 8
4/15
Continuity

4 4/18 HW 3 due
9
4/20
10
4/22 LF 2 due
11

5 4/25 HW 4 due
5,10,11
4/27
5,10,11
4/29
5,10,11

6 5/2 HW 5 due
11,12
5/4 LF 3 due
12
5/6
Midterm Exam

7 5/9
14
5/11
14
5/13
15, 16

8 5/16 HW 6 due
15, 16
5/18
17, 18
5/20 LF 4 due
22

9 5/23 HW 7 due
22
5/25
19, 21
5/27
20

10 5/30
Memorial Day
6/1 HW 8 due
23, 24
6/3 LF 5 due
Review

Exams 6/6          6/7
6/8           6/9
          Final Exam
6/10


Course Description

  • Catalog description

    This course uses a variety of topics in mathematics to introduce the students to rigorous mathematical proof, emphasizing quantifiers, induction, negation, proof by contradiction, naive set theory, equivalence relations and epsilon-delta proofs. Required of all departmental majors. Prerequisite: Math. 20F or Math 31AH or consent of instructor.
  • Meetings

    • Lectures: MWF 1:00PM - 1:50PM, Peterson 104.
    • Discussion sections: Thursdays SOLIS 111. (See Triton Link for the meeting time for your section.)
    • Office hours: see homepage for instructor and TA office hours.
    You are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures and discussion sections, and to raise any additional questions at office hours. The material in this course is challenging but rewarding. Make sure you give yourself every opportunity to learn it well.
  • Textbook

    Peter J. Eccles, An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning.
  • Homework

    The best (and only) way to learn mathematics is by doing it. In this course, you will be learning new mathematical concepts, and will also be developing mathematical communication skills. So, there will be two kinds of homework.
    • Homework exercises will be due weekly and will be relatively quick exercises to increase your familiarity with the concepts covered in the class. The assignments are posted here; check often in case of updates. Each assignment will consist of five (5) questions and will be graded out of 25 points.
    • Long-form homework will be due once every two weeks and will roughly correspond to the five major parts of the course. They will involve slightly longer investigations of key concepts, usually requiring some proof and some computation. One of the goals of these assignments is to help you develop your mathematical writing skills. To this end, these assignments must be typed (though you may choose to write out by hand any computations or tables/figures) in full sentences of grammatically correct English. Your exposition should be self-contained: include the problem statement and any definitions you require. The idea is that a fellow math major who isn't currently in the class should be able to pick up your work and understand both what you are trying to prove and how you proved it. The grading scheme for these assignments is available here, along with a sample.
    • You are allowed and encouraged to work on the homework problems together. However, you must write up the solutions individually. UCSD's policy on Academic Integrity may be found here. Homework must be neatly written or typed up and stapled together. No late homework will be accepted.
    • Exams

      There will be an in-class midterm exam and a final exam. The exam dates are on the calendar above. You may not use any notes, books, or calculators during the exams. To prevent distraction and any appearance of cheating, any cell phones must be put away during exams.
    • Grading

      Final grades in the course will be assigned according to the following approximate weighting:
      homework exercises 10%, long-form homework 15%, midterm exam 25%, and final exam 50%.
      The homework grades will be based on your best 7 of 8 homework exercises and your best 4 of 5 long-form homeworks.